Age is no bar to fitness

admin-ajax

After.

A few people asked me whether it was me on the cover of my recent book. Alas, it was not; it was a stock photo of a male model several decades younger than me. But this photo is me; while it’s not too well-focused, it’s all I’ve got at the moment.

A few stats to fill in a little detail. I’m 5’10”, and weighed 170 this morning. I’ve been lifting seriously for four years now, although I did lift, perhaps not so seriously, at other times in my life. When I started four years ago, I was just coming out of 11 years of chronic fatigue syndrome. (The science behind that I covered in another book, Smash Chronic Fatigue.) I weighed 38 pounds less when I started. I take no anabolic steroids, and am within months of turning 60 years old.

I currently work out about twice a week, but my goal, which has been mostly successful lately, is to be in the gym once every three days. I do a two-way split; workout A is legs, shoulders, traps, and abs; workout B is back (including deadlifts), chest, and arms. I don’t do any cardio at the moment, but I have been doing some HIT a couple times a week, which I may try to get back into. Problem is, the HIT was cutting into my recovery, so I dropped it a couple months ago.

Anyway, I’m no physique competitor or bodybuilder, but just wanted to show that I live what I recommend and that being older is no bar to physical fitness.

Before.

Before.

image_pdf

Leave a Comment:

15 comments
Lenny says November 11, 2014

Amazing outcome. You should be proud.

Do you feel different? Of course, less the fatigue. But how – day to day – have your overall quality of life changed?

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says November 11, 2014

    The fatigue being gone is of course wonderful. At some point I thought I would have it forever, and in fact they tell you that CFS is incurable or nearly so. Other than that, I guess I feel more confident. And thanks, I am proud of it.

    Reply
nightboat2cairo says November 12, 2014

Mr Mangan, I’ve been reading you for years but I don’t recall ever commenting. A career lurker, but I figured this was the post to start saying something. Kudos to you for putting yourself out there. Your message is far stronger with some identity behind it. Your personal story with CFS is very interesting.

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says November 12, 2014

    Thanks, I think you’re right about having identity behind the message. One or two others have told me that, which is partly why I did it. The other part was vanity 😉

    Reply
      nightboat2cairo says November 12, 2014

      It is good to see how it works. I blog under a different identity for my business and I’ve been hiding myself and focusing on my work, but watching how your image adds weight to your message I’m going to put more of me on the site. Thanks again.

      Reply
        P. D. Mangan says November 12, 2014

        By the way, love the reference to the Madness song. Now I can’t get it out of my head.

        Reply
          nightboat2cairo says November 12, 2014

          Heh, thanks. The joys of finding a sensible Twitter handle when the namespace is full of empty accounts. It took me a while, but I like it.

          Reply
ElamBend says November 13, 2014

What lead you to the changes in lifestyle to get out of CFS after so long? Was a particular person or article a catalyst?

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says November 13, 2014

    Yes, if I had to pinpoint one person, it’s probably the late Rich van Konynenberg, and independent researcher who did some fundamental theorizing about chronic fatigue. (His articles can be found online.) After him I was led to Michael Maes, M.D., who has laid a basic biochemical framework for chronic fatigue as well as its co-morbid disorders like depression. Also I distinctly remember the point at which I realized that being a vegetarian was no longer an option, that it was contributing (at the least) to my illness.

    Reply
Graham says November 13, 2014

Hey Mangan, you look incredible for nearly 60 (no homo). I just bought Best Supplements and I was curious about whether taking magnesium citrate before bed as is recommended would have the effect of breaking a fast if one was attempting to practice intermittant fasting. Also do you think it likely that either chewing gum, or eating breath mints would also stop autophagy? Big fan of the blog, it is so difficult to get helpful and informative advice on nutrition from mainstream sources, so this site has been tremendously helpful for me. Keep up the good work.

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says November 13, 2014

    Glad you got the book. No, magnesium or any other mineral won’t break an intermittent fast, but not sure about breath mints or chewing gum. If they have aspartame or similar instead of sugar, you’ll be OK. Sugar has the effect of raising insulin levels hence stopping autophagy. It may seem odd that a tiny piece of mint or gum could do that, but maybe several could; insulin levels probably don’t need to rise very much to abolish autophagy. Of course I’m speculating here.

    Really glad the blog has been helpful to you. I agree that the mainstream has many things wrong; it’s also aimed at the average person, who doesn’t care that much about his health.

    Reply
Kindke says November 13, 2014

very inspirational considering your age, consistency is definitely the most important thing when it comes to gains in the gym, as your progress rapidly reverses if you stop going.

Have you had your T levels measured mangan?

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says November 13, 2014

    Not lately, but last time I did they were mid-range of normal.

    Reply
      awesome says November 13, 2014

      Still, mid range is excellent for someone of your vintage. I see you’re favourable to TRT, have you tried that, or anti-estrogens? I’m late 30’s with 2 decades of gym gains, but a stubborn tire that isn’t budging as easily as it did 3 years ago..

      Reply
Graham says November 14, 2014

Thanks for the reply.

That’s reassuring, I know both the gum and mints are sugar free. The main ingredients in the mints are Xylitol and Aspartame. I have been attempting to practice intermittent fasting and wanted to avoid walking around at work with offensive breath, nice to know these won’t be interrupting the process.

Reply
Add Your Reply