Category Archives for Iron

A Discussion on Iron and Health with Leo Zacharski, M.D.

Leo Zacharski, M.D., is a hematologist, oncologist, and professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, and is arguably the world’s leading expert on the relation between iron and disease.

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The Normal Value for Iron and Why It Matters

Iron is stored in the body in the protein ferritin, which is considered the best measure of body iron stores. One of the most important aspects of my book Dumping Iron is that the laboratory normal ranges

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Anti-Aging Drugs Rapamycin and Metformin Decrease Iron

Anti-aging drugs rapamycin and metformin decrease iron. Rapamycin and metformin are the most touted drugs with the potential to increase human lifespan. The noted scientist aging research Vladimir Anissimov

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Cancer As a Metabolic Disease and Iron

The theory of cancer as a metabolic disease states that metabolic aberrations, not gene mutations, cause cancer. (Previously discussed here.) In this article I’ll discuss how iron can plausibly be

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How Blood Donations Deplete Iron

A reader asked me a question that stumped me at first, so here’s the question, and my answer as to how blood donations deplete iron. Q: “How is it possible to remove as much or more iron as

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Blood Donations, Blood Transfusions, and Iron

In the course of my book Dumping Iron, I discussed blood donations and some of their technicalities, specifically how they lower body iron stores.  In this short article I’ll discuss a few more

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Young Blood, Aging, and Iron

The by-now famous experiments that have tied the circulations of young and old animals together, showing the rejuvenating effects of “young blood”, have also shown that the harmful effects

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High Iron Means Increased Risk of Gestational Diabetes

Quick take: High iron means increased risk of gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in up to 10% of pregnant women, and can lead to complications for both mother and child. Complications include

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Iron and Fungal Infections

We saw recently that iron is involved, however unlikely it may seem, in producing dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and quite possibly, male pattern baldness. These conditions all have in common that a

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Higher Heart Disease Risk in Post-Menopausal Women Is Due to Iron

One of the key pieces of evidence leading to the implication that iron causes heart disease is the differential incidence of heart disease between men and women. Men have far higher rates of heart disease,

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Do Bacteria Cause Hypercoagulation and Aging?

I recently wrote about hypercoagulation, which is the phenomenon of increased activation of blood clotting and decreased activation of clot dissolution, and how it’s connected to aging. I showed

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Does Iron Cause Cancer?

Does iron cause cancer? On one hand, those who have read my book Dumping Iron as well as my articles on iron may not be surprised, but those new to this topic may wonder that there could be a link between

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How Iron and Bacteria Combine to Promote Aging

Microbes in normally sterile body sites One of the more remarkable developments in recent years in the field of health and aging is the recognition that bacteria and other microbes such as fungi can be

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Cold Exposure Increases Insulin Sensitivity

Type 2 diabetes, which is reaching epidemic proportions, is characterized by increased insulin resistance. The hormone insulin doesn’t work as well as normally, and so the beta cells in the pancreas

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Health Benefits of Blood Donation Are Immediate

High iron causes disease Body iron stores are correlated with and likely causative of cancer, heart disease, infections, and lots of other bad things, all of which I discussed in my recent book, Dumping

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Why Men Must Check Their Iron for Good Health

I’ve written a lot about the dangers of excess iron. But what constitutes an “excess” amount of iron is key here. Ferritin is the most important measure of iron, but the normal range

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