Default

“Your default is to do what is easy, but you’re happier when challenged. You need to fight your instincts.”

Source.

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M says December 6, 2012

Hi Dennis,

I thought I’d provide you an update on my usage of n-acetylcysteine. As I mentioned in a previous comment, within a couple days of its usage (a moderate-to-large dose based on the literature) I started feeling a significant sense of _calm_. This feeling lasted for a couple of weeks as I continued its usage. Then it seemed like my body adjusted and I started feeling the same anxiety that I felt before, to the point where I felt I was deriving no benefit from its usage. A friend of mine, who I recommended take n-acetylcysteine when I was feeling the calmative effects, experienced the same cycle and is no longer taking it.

A question that is raised is: should n-acetylcysteine be cycled? Taken at a lower dose? Any input would be appreciated.

Also, I disagree with your post about chopping off body parts to some extent. The woman who was in the news lately who is removing her breasts – Allyn Rose, who is young, healthy, 24 – has an extremely strong chance of developing breast cancer, which her mom, grandmother, and great-aunt all died from (and which has been less reported than the more sensational part). Her mom first developed cancer at 27. For someone who’s into genetics and HBD, I would imagine you would be sympathetic to her decision. You can read more about it here: http://www.wtop.com/109/3128218/Miss-DCs-drastic-double-mastectomy

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Mangan says December 6, 2012

M: I can’t see any reason why NAC should be cycled. It’s the rate-limiting factor in glutathione production; taking an excess would result in the NAC being oxidized, not incorporated into glutathione, I believe. In some trials, patienmts have taken up to 8 grams a day (not that I’d recommend that). But if cycling works, then maybe something else is going on.

The interview you linked doesn’t really say that the cancer that killed her relatives has a genetic origin, and even if it were, that doesn’t mean that the environment (diet) doesn’t matter. But I agree that the case isn’t so simple.

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