Dumping Iron e-book is available for pre-order

dumping iron

dumping iron

My forthcoming book, Dumping Iron: How to Ditch This Secret Killer and Reclaim Your Health, is now available for pre-order in e-book form. The paperback version is on its way, ready possibly in a few days. Although the date of release is set at April 11, my understanding is that I can make that date earlier if I decide, and that will very likely happen. Amazon has strict rules about putting a book up for pre-order and they warn you that it must be fully available by the date set. So just in case, I gave myself plenty of time, but at this point I’m thinking the book will be for sale by next week.

For regular readers here, if you buy the book, I’d really appreciate it if you left a review on Amazon. Reviews are very important to getting notice and selling.

The book has received endorsements from top iron experts (read them here), including Leo Zacharski, M.D., Lt. Col. (Italy) Luca Mascitelli, M.D., Eugene Weinberg, PhD, and Francesco Facchini, M.D. By my reckoning, there aren’t many other experts in this field in the world; not that others haven’t done important work, but these men stand out.

My friend Jay Campbell has called the book “revolutionary”.

The book does at least two things: it summarizes the evidence that iron promotes aging and disease and is indeed one of the most important promoters; and it provides clear explanation and instruction on how to control your iron levels.

How important is iron for health?

As readers know, I consider excess body iron to be quite detrimental to health. It’s a pity that we don’t hear more about that, but doctors either don’t know or don’t care. They’ll put you on destructive drugs like a statin or an SSRI sooner than they’ll measure your ferritin (iron) level.

How important is iron compared to other known health factors? That gets into somewhat speculative territory, but I made an attempt at a comparison in the last part of my book.

I believe that controlling your iron is necessary, but not sufficient.

If you maintain a normal body weight with a low amount of fat and adequate muscle, if you eat right and avoid sugar and refined carbohydrates and other junk, exercise, have good sleep habits, and generally have good health practices in other areas of life, but you don’t control your iron stores, then its my belief that high iron may well cancel out many of your good health practices.

The median survival age of a man with a ferritin over 600 is 55 years. Men with a ferritin over 200 had more than twice the risk of a heart attack. Iron is that important.

If you are overweight, a couch potato, eat garbage food, and so on, will a low normal iron level save you? No, it will not.

The control of your iron level should be added to a suite of good health practices.

Is iron more important than cholesterol? Yes, I believe it is. More so than your blood sugar? Probably not.

The Iron Revolution

It’s my hope that this book will greatly raise awareness of iron as a cause of ill health.

One reason we don’t hear more about this is that there’s little money to be made in controlling iron. Pharmaceutical companies therefore have no incentive to investigate it, and Big Pharma profits largely control the medical agenda. That’s why we hear so much nonsense about cholesterol and statins.

Just as in many other health matters, if you want to control iron, you’re going to have to take matters into your own hands by educating yourself and being assertive. Doctors don’t like to be caught being less informed than their patients, although my guess is that most of them will comply with a simple request for ferritin testing.

Read the book and get control of your iron and your health.

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12 comments
Kevin says March 9, 2016

Pre-ordered it today. Not that I don’t already accept your position, but I have most of your other books, and I want to support what you’re doing here. I’ve already donated blood twice in the last three months, and plan to donate six times this year, and two to three times each year thereafter. I’ve been following a lot of the advice in Muscle Up and Best Supplements for a about three months, and I’m very pleased with the results. I want to thank you for what you’re doing here, Mangan. In this short time I’ve gone from a BMI of 27 to less than 24. I’m sleeping better than ever and lifting several times a week. I’ve started to change my diet to largely follow the Perfect Health Diet, which I discovered from your review. Your work has definitely made a big difference for the better in my life.

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says March 9, 2016

    That’s great, Kevin, glad to hear about your success.

    Reply
John says March 9, 2016

This is good news. I just had a ferritin blood test. Results next week. Thanks for putting this on everyone’s radar.

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Garrett says March 11, 2016

I did not and probably will not buy your books, because I have already a 1000+ queue of books I want to read in my lifetime.
But because you offer most relevant info here on your website for free and compact for quick info, I want to express my gratitude for your work by providing some information I hope will be valuable for you:

(1)
Very strong evidence for sitting hours continuously on your butt all day and cancer development exists.
http://www.aicr.org/assets/images/Research/ResearchConf/2011pictures/MakeTimeBreakTime_x500.jpg
http://www.cancer.org/myacs/illinois/do-not-just-sit-there
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19346988
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2812%2961031-9/abstract
Take note that it is not physical activity per se, but periods longer than about one hour without a bit of exercise/movement/muscle strain is what increases probability of cancer; so a one-time exercise session per day is very sub optimal in that regard.
Many more sources and studies exist.
Bascially, researchers say you should move about at at least once per hour;
most people do not do that. I, too, basically sit all day on my butt looking at screens or paper.
What do? I spread my training over the day by using a timer that beeps after 60 min, and then I will do one set of exercise – with the intent to work as many muscles as possible, to keep them “activated” and enjoy a higher metabolic base rate, among other things; so I do one set of push-ups, squats – and when at home where I got a bar, pull-ups. The push-ups alone are very effective – every day I do 10 sets, about 1 set once per hour and +1 per set the next day; a guy who starts at 1 will do 10 the first day, and with time, arrive at 1000 push-ups a day after 3-6 months. This is almost comfortable; you do not sweat, and you can always easily motivate yourself for one single set of exercise, because it takes less than a minute per set. I now do 1000 push-ups per day, which take less than 12 minutes to do per day. This is, of course, not what is advised as a training regime usually, a classic “short and hard” – kind of training is said to work “better”, e.g. give quicker results. But my “one set per hour” system works well with me, too – muscle/strength development is definitely good.
For endurance, I apply HIT/HIIT training, usually before I shower anyway so it fits effortlessly in my day – I train by running (good weather and at home) or by burpees (bad weather or when traveling and staying in hotels): This develops my endurance as well as 30/60 minute-running three times per week (which I did before), as I measured (running times and heart rate).
The bottom line is: This spread-over-the-day/short-time-exercising training regime may be a bit sub-optimal for quickest gains, but will work in the end, too, and it is much more compatible with contemporary daily life-/work
customs, plus the bonus of less probability of cancer. And it can be very comfortably done every day, everywhere.

(2)
I am a green tea consumer, too. I drink lots, 4L+ per day, and usually nothing else.
Try different mixes and brands, some taste wonderful, others terrible; but I always like them sweetened. This causes a problem – sucrose rots your teeth and will make you fat/trigger insulin; artificial sweeteners taste sub-optimally and may be unhealthy. Solution:
Combination of Stevia tablets (ST) and xylitol (Xy): ST is very reliably nontoxic;
xylitol will keep your teeth healthy (it actually kills caries-inducing bacteria), has 2/3 of calories of regular sugar, and has a negligible glycemic index of less than 10, so will not trigger insulin. ST+Xy taste “perfect” sugary and will keep you thin and in good dental health while allowing you to all day drink sweetened tea.

(3)
Do not “eat” your resveratrol; it is hardly bio-active due to very low absorption.
Instead, take it with a bit of water and swirl it in your mouth for a few minutes, being absorbed buccally – almost 100% absorption is assured.
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0090131

(4)
Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEP)
Evolutionary, when we started heating food we got rid of parasites/bacteria etc. and enjoyed greater life span and health. This got us to get older than about 30 years.
Today we get much older, and the heating of some foodstuff in some ways drastically induces disease and shortens life span by creating chemicals in the food through excessive heat that are highly toxic in the long run; I think you want to read this very carefully:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3704564/pdf/nihms482555.pdf
Basically, staying away from eating much AGEP results in significantly longer life in much better health; most of the effects result from glycation, which irreversibly damages proteins in the body, much in the same way as a high concentration of glucose in the blood ages, weakens and kills diabetics.

Now to some maybe secondary, but I think nonetheless very effective and easy proven ways to improve health/longevity:

(5)
Simple tomato(juice)/lycopene
There is a very powerful dose-effect correlation between regular intake and dramatic decline in heart attacks/stroke.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-10-tomatoes.html
medicalxpress.com/news/2011-05-tomatoes-ward-heart-disease.html
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23045517
It is rare that an protective effect that strong can be attributed to one single factor.

(6)
Get your nuts, especially roasted, skin-less peanuts every day:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150610190920.htm
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1307352

(7)
You will probably find this interesting:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3543739/pdf/11357_2011_Article_9325.pdf

(8)
For those with appetite-based diet problems – olive oil may mitigate your hunger:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314124616.htm

I hope this helps or is at least found interesting.
Sorry if my English is weird, I am a native German speaker.

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says March 11, 2016

    Thanks, Garrett. Have you read Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung? Because I have, so you better get cracking.

    Reply
      John says March 11, 2016

      Gee, PD. Are you trying to improve our minds as well? I’m not sure I can handle this much self-improvement. (ha, ha). If you can point me to a 20-page so English synopsis, I’m up for that. But a couple of volumes of hardcore philosophy, is a bridge too far for me.

      Reply
        P. D. Mangan says March 12, 2016

        Haha, John, that’s a tough one. But I’ve liked Bryan Magee’s books, in this case his “The Philosophy of Schopenhauer”. Also great is the Penguin edition of Schopenhauer, “Essays and Aphorisms”, which is fairly short.

        Reply
    John says March 11, 2016

    Great post, Garrett. You mentioned doing some kind of brief exercise once an hour. Makes sense to me. I’m trying out the timer function on my iPhone so that it’ll remind me every hour to drop down and do 10 pushups, or walk up and down a flight of stairs, or whatever. Mr Mangan mentions this idea in “Stop the Clock” when he talks about being active in addition to getting exercise; the idea that the sedentary lifestyle is bad. Your once-an-hour idea is very specific – news i can use.

    Reply
Matt says March 11, 2016

Hi Dennis,

My father is a world-class triathlete in his early 60s. He does intense cardio training around six hours per day, very little strength training, has low cholesterol, eats very little fat (will only eat very lean, chewy, overcooked meat) but lots of carbs for energy (especially those glucose packets, which he consumes daily), and has a single-digit body fat percentage (and killer 6-pack). This is his lifestyle, and it has given him extremely high-performance output for decades.

Unfortunately, it also gave him a quadruple bypass in his 50s. Despite the near-death experience, he hasn’t altered his routine one bit, and despite being on statins is now showing evidence of arterial calcification in his feet, which means probably everywhere. I suspect that he is metabolically very ill (despite looking great), and I want to steer him away from his lifestyle into a LCHF, weight lifting, statin-free, low cardio lifestyle, but it would almost be easier to convert the Pope to Islam. He’s got decades of misinformation, habit, and social pressure (as mentioned, he is a high-performing minor celebrity in the Iron Man community) keeping him entrenched in his ways, and it’s going to kill him. “We all have to die of something” he says, and I can respect that, but at the same time he doesn’t have to go so early if he’d just choose to excel in a different way.

My question- which of your books (or any resource you’re aware of) would be best suited to make the case for him to alter his lifestyle?

Thanks for your time

Reply
Isabel says March 17, 2016

Hello! I was recommended your website by a friend. I’ve been reading attentively and now I’m a bit scared about all that iron. However, I happen to be female. Is menstruation enough to get rid of the extra iron, or should women also take dietary habits?

Reply
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