The FDA is coming after testosterone

Testosterone_estradiol_conversion

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is currently reviewing whether to limit testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) to certain narrowly defined conditions. See: Will the FDA Tighten the Use of Testosterone Replacement Therapy? Knowing how the FDA works on these things, it’s a good bet that restriction of TRT will be the order of the day.

Ironic – or hypocritical – it is that estrogen-related hormones are handed out to women like candy. But men face high scrutiny when asking for TRT. Let’s call it the War on Men. But that’s neither here nor there, since there’s nothing we can do about it.

If you need TRT, whether due to age or some other reason, count on facing extra scrutiny from your doctor. Although the FDA ruling may only affect drug companies’ ability to advertize testosterone, and not your doctor’s ability to prescribe it, you can bet that doctors will be extra wary about it with the possibility of the FDA or state boards breathing down their necks.

I would say that this gives extra impetus to the use of aromatase inhibitors, which I discussed both here and in my book. Aromatase inhibitors, such as anastrozole, can increase testosterone levels by 50 to 100%, and doctors will be more likely to prescribe them.

Another aromatase inhibitor is diindolylmethane (DIM), an OTC supplement. However, I’m not aware of any studies that showed an increase in T with DIM. (If any reader is aware of one, I’d appreciate leaving a link in comments.)

Resveratrol is also an aromatase inhibitor, and in rats, it doubled sperm counts and T levels.

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5 comments
Jay Campbell says November 5, 2014

Hey Brother! Ordered your book. I’m currently writing one myself (which should be out by January or perhaps early February) The Definitive TRT Manual for Men: Become a Supreme Alpha Male -2 Versions Gen X and Baby Boomer Editions.

In my research and in speaking with some leading Anti Aging Doctors, prescribing Aromatase Inhibitors without TRT is risky due to potential bone density issues from too low estradiol often resulting from even minimum dosing protocols.

Optimally it is best to be using TRT-monitoring lab values (estradiol obviously)and also utilizing estrogen inhibitors if the situation warrants. There are far too many benefits (as you are well aware) to not allow men to increase T levels through legitimate pharmaceutical grade means.

The real debate as I will present in my book is the optimal dosing strategy for delivering TRT in the most efficient way possible. Way too many Endo’s and TRT prescribing Physicians are using inefficient delivery mechanisms.

I would love to do a Podcast with you in the future to discuss this necessary subject for the aging male.

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    P. D. Mangan says November 5, 2014

    Jay, thanks, hope you get some value out of my book. Re bone density issues with aromatase inhibitors, in my experience (which is not vast in this area) a doctor can prescribe an AI and then test for estradiol after a few weeks. Assuming estradiol is in the normal range, you’re set to go, otherwise dosage can be adjusted up or down. One thing I’m curious about but which I’ve been unable to find any solid answers, is how much OTC aromatase inhibitors will raise T, AIs like resveratrol or DIM.

    Look forward to reading your book, and as for a podcast, I’m open to that, and I’ll shoot you an email.

    Reply
eah says November 15, 2014

Ironic – or hypocritical – it is that estrogen-related hormones are handed out to women like candy.

And to the population in general, right? Via xenoestrogen and the like.

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Dim Testosterone says November 15, 2016

[…] The FDA is coming after testosterone – Aromatase inhibitors, such as anastrozole, can increase testosterone levels by 50 to 100%, and doctors will be more likely to prescribe them. Another aromatase inhibitor is diindolylmethane (DIM), an OTC supplement. However, I’m not aware of any … […]

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