Why Iron Is the Most Underrated Factor in Health

I wrote an article at Medium.com, Why Iron Is the Most Underrated Factor in Health.

You’ve got your diet and exercise locked down, you sleep well, take a few supplements, in general, you follow good health practices. Is there anything you’ve forgotten?
Yes, excess iron, the most overlooked factor in health. Iron, which accumulates in our bodies over a lifetime, can cause heart disease, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases; it can increase the rate and severity of infections and lead to faster aging.

Read the rest. If you hit the “like” button on the article, it moves up and will get more readers — that’s my understanding anyway — so please do.

PS: Check out my Supplements Buying Guide for Men, and my new book, Dumping Iron.

PPS: Stay tuned for my interview with Michael Fossel, M.D., PhD, author of The Telomerase Revolution. Should be awesome.

image_pdf

Leave a Comment:

14 comments
Ollie says April 20, 2016

Mr. Mangan, I sincerely believe that in due time, your work highlighting the effects of iron will be viewed as a great contribution to the interest of public health, perhaps on the order of the anti-tobacco efforts. The more I investigate the issue myself, the more I find damning evidence against the iron fortification of processed food. I know you have been diligently studying the subject, and are likely familiar with most of the available material already, but I hope some of the links I dropped in previous comments are of use to you. Keep up the good work, sir.

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says April 20, 2016

    Ollie, thank you so much, I’m grateful to hear that. I’m certainly not the only one who has ever said anything about the ill health effects of iron, nor is it my original research – I just compile it, more or less. But the effects of iron are large, and basically no one knows about it. Let’s hope the word gets out.

    Reply
      Rick Duker says January 30, 2017

      I had never heard of the hazards of iron either until I started reading this blog. Since I’m not a blood donor i will need to consider my options for reducing it. Thanks for bringing this to light.

      Reply
ConantheContrarian says April 22, 2016

Mangan, you have talked about green tea extract, which I assume is a supplement in a capsule. Is it more effective than drinking green tea? If one drinks green tea, is there a special brand that should be chosen over others? Thanks for the great information.

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says April 22, 2016

    Conan, a green tea extract capsule has about 5 times the polyphenols as a cup of green tea. This will obviously vary depending on brand of capsule and brand of tea you compare it to. If you want to go all out, try Japanese matcha tea – it’s expensive. Otherwise no, but you might want to avpoid cheap tea from China, which often seems to be contaminated with heavy metals.

    Reply
Erik J says April 24, 2016

What kind of frying pan do you recommend? I’m thinking of buying a carbon steel pan, but they and cast iron pans emitt small amounts of iron into the food. But “non-stick” pans usually are made of some other questionable often poisonous material.

Whats your take on this?

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says April 24, 2016

    Hi Erik, cast iron pans do put small amounts of iron into food, depending on what you’re cooking. Tomato sauce and other acidic foods leach the most iron, on the order of 1 to several mg. Carbon steel pans I know nothing about. I also have to be agnostic on Teflon: I use one myself, and I’m not aware of any significant toxicity, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. Here’s an article that says when used correctly, there’s little danger of toxicity with teflon: http://swac.web.unc.edu/thepipettepen/ask-a-toxicologist-is-it-safe-to-use-teflon-pans/ Seems to me that carbon steel would not put as much iron in food, but that’s a guess.

    Reply
      Erik J says April 24, 2016

      Thanks, im also thinking about a ceramic pan. But I’m quite young yet (in my 20’s) so perhaps i dont have to worry very much about iron overload yet?

      Reply
        P. D. Mangan says April 24, 2016

        Yes, iron overload isn’t usually evident at that age, but ferritin is increasing rapidly. By age 30, something to be aware of.

        Reply
How I Plan to Reach 110 Years of Age - Rogue Health and Fitness says April 27, 2016

[…] other nasty things. I’ve lowered my ferritin  to, at last check, 77, and plan to go lower. Keeping iron low is the most underrated factor in health. Read my book, Dumping Iron, to find out the several ways you can keep iron in the low normal […]

Reply
Tuba says June 3, 2016

I recently got my “iron” test back from the V.A.. Which of the four measurements am I suppose to pay attention to in regard to your thesis and monitoring it? Iron Saturation 25%; Ferritin 69.4 ng/ml; Transferrin 278 mg/dl; iron 99 ug/dl.

Reply
    P. D. Mangan says June 4, 2016

    Ferritin is the one that determines iron stores, and yours is pretty good at about 70.

    Reply
Ole says June 19, 2016

Everything with moderation. Low iron stores increases the bioaccumulation of cadmium. Cadmium is primarily found in vegetables, grains, meat/organ meats. Cocoa also has a significant amount of cadmium. Cadmium primarily damages the kidneys.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041008X07001901

Reply
    Tuba says June 19, 2016

    The phrase “Everything with moderation” is an excuse not think. Try some cyanide in moderation.

    Reply
Add Your Reply