Multi-Supplement Abolishes Brain Cell Loss

A scientist named C. D. Rollo has done extensive work on the ability of a complex supplement to combat aging. He uses a strain of transgenic mice that have high levels of growth hormone and IGF-1, which promote aging. Previously, Rollo and his team found that this complex, multi-supplement extended their lifespan by 28%, and even extended the lifespan of normal, wild-type mice by 11%. A more recent study found that this multi-supplement abolishes brain cell loss in these animals.

The ingredients of the multi-supplement are as follows:

complex supplement

 

In a just published study, his team used the same transgenic mouse model to study the loss of brain cells, an important malady of aging that leads to dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease, or in milder cases, cognitive impairment. (1)

These mice experience severe cognitive decline, losing greater than half the cells in the mid-brain region, the equivalent of a human case of Alzheimer’s.

They report that the multi-supplement completely abolishes the loss of brain cells in these mice, reverses cognitive decline, and increases sensory and motor function. Photoreceptor cells in the eyes were also increased.

The researchers comment, “We know of no other treatment with such efficacy, highlighting the potential for prevention or amelioration of human neuropathologies that are similarly associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular dysfunction.” [My emphasis.]

So, what’s going on here?

Excess growth hormone and/or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) promote aging, and lead to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and insulin resistance. These conditions then lead to the loss of brain cells.

The ingredients in the complex supplement alleviate these conditions and prevent the death of brain cells.

N-acetylcysteine and alpha lipoic acid increase glutathione, the body’s most important internal antioxidant.

Green tea extract promotes autophagy, the cellular self-cleansing process that gets rid of junk molecules that have passed their expiration date.

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA): this is aspirin, currently one of the most effective anti-aging drugs known.

Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fish oil and are very important for health, decrease inflammation.

The list goes on, but the important point is that these ingredients can protect against many of the ravages of aging. It would be difficult if not impossible to obtain the amounts of these substances in the supplement through diet alone.

PS: Check out my Supplements Buying Guide for Men.

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13 comments
Tuba says June 6, 2016

One of the chemicals I have concerns about is Chromium Picolinate. There’s a lot of verbiage saying it’s not necessary, it’s not healthy, and it gets metabolized into cancer-triggering chemicals.

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Tuba says June 7, 2016

The other problem is that flaxseed oil has been implicated in early and aggressive prostate cancer. No sense having a sharp brain and a rotting bladder squeeze.

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    bigmyc says June 9, 2016

    At what point can we be sure that “implicated” is certain to mean, “causes?” Lavender, for instance, was long “known” to be an estrogenic mimic and thus, would promote gnynomastecomia (sp?). Further and more recent research now states that this is baloney. Perhaps the same is true of flax seed oil. After all, it is high in Omega 3s but I can’t say that I am aware of any other nutrients/anti-nutrients that it is dense with.

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      Tuba says June 9, 2016

      I was being gentle. The studies are across the board, helps it and harms it but although the darling of people who don’t know how to eat (vegetarians) the weight falls on the rotting side. Personally I avoid most things vegetarians are hot on, and, I avoid woman food… I mean crap like soy… When I die I will at least die manly.

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        bigmyc says June 16, 2016

        Sounds like then, we are looking at “selective science.” Flaxseed isn’t a panacea nor is it a harbinger of ill health, probably. By “across the board” and the context that you used it in, I take it to mean that studies are diametric in their conclusions. When that happens, I simply eschew the studies as clearly there were many confounders in them. How many “eggs are bad” studies have you come across? I’ve seen enough of ’em to warrant my suspicion on studies that vilify food items like flaxseed. I stay away from soy for a lot of reasons, none of which that I am aware of apply to flaxseed. Consider that flaxseed isn’t even something that I eat remotely close to regularly but its qualification for its vilification, particularly with prostate health, I just don’t get.

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          Tuba says June 16, 2016

          Okay…. what if half the studies say eating peanuts causes your penis to drop off, in 40 percent of the other studies the penis did not drop off but malfunctions and in the other 10% it was getting ready to drop off but had not dropped off but the peanuts were suspect. Would you continue to eat peanuts ‘cause it was not definitive? That’s the Russian Roulette you’re playing with your prostate when you eat flax products.

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          bigmyc says June 16, 2016

          I’ll humor your ridiculous comparison because as warped as it was, it does make a point. Again, I don’t consume much flax but with its Omega 3 content, I wonder how bad it could really be. That a single, seemingly innocuous and digestible food item could be a catalyst for cancer seems far fetched. Consider that many people who eat the stuff probably are vegans/vegetarian and probably have diet deficiencies as it is and its likely that this is the culprit of immune disorders, of which, cancer is one. I don’t believe that your earlier post was really that clear in your prose about the studies on flax. A ding-a-ling coming loose is also an abrupt result to a “study” and because of it, much more conclusive than say, cancer development status. I wonder what other elements of their diets did these cancer patients have in common…I bet they eat lots of red meat…..yeah, red meat for sure.

          Oh, by the way, you seem to have a fear of physical emasculation….I would stay away from gynecomastia inducing soy then.

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Matt says June 8, 2016

Tuba,

Can you post some studies or sources talking about chromium and flaxseed? Would be interested in reading more about it if that’s the case.

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Ole Pedersen says June 9, 2016

I wonder, why Zinc is left out? Zinc is a key mineral for cellular function. Also, Zinc is known to revert age related thymus involution..

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    P. D. Mangan says June 9, 2016

    Good catch, Ole, I’ve no idea why.

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      Ole Pedersen says June 9, 2016

      In fact, leaving out resveratrol is less of a surprise. You can achieve SIRT activation through a number of other ways like e.g. exercise and CR/IF. But leaving zinc out makes no sense, as it is involved in so many key cellular functions.

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        Ole Pedersen says June 9, 2016

        But as you mention, we can only speculate, as to why zinc has been left out…

        Reply
bigmyc says June 9, 2016

I am curious as to how and where this supplement would be available. It seems as if this supplement was possibly tailor made for this particular study and that would be understandable but I’d then like to know why the researchers chose that particular combination of ingredients.

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