The autism epidemic: Is diagnostic substitution the story?

http://deevybee.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/autism-epidemic-and-diagnostic.html

Quote:

It is becoming clear that changing diagnostic criteria, increased awareness of ASD, and strategic use of diagnosis to gain access to services, have had a massive effect on the numbers of children with ASD. When I started studies in this area, I thought diagnostic substitution had happened but I did not think it would be sufficient to explain the increase in numbers of ASD diagnoses. But now, on the basis of studies reviewed here, I think it could be the full story.

If true, then there is no autism epidemic.

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8 comments
dearieme says October 31, 2012

I’ve wondered for a long time whether this might be true, but it’s difficult to see how the matter might be settled conclusively.

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Anonymous says October 31, 2012

If 1% of children born are in some way disabled — whether there has been an increase or not — it is still an emergency. What has “emerged” is the ability to detect the disability.

It is in the interests of The Powers That Be to discount any degradation of conditions as merely “better diagnosis”. If societal disasters really are increasing under their rule, they can turn that to their benefit by claiming that without them, we never would have become aware of of the problems created by their predecessors.

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Nyk says October 31, 2012

Dear Mr. Mangan, this is a bit OT but I would like to ask for your medical opinion. One of my molars needs to be extracted and I am thinking about having an implant replacement. There are Titanium or Zirconium options. The question is, what is the safer option long-term for me in terms of health (or, is any reasonably safe tooth implant possible at all)? Obviously, I’m asking you because you also read the non-mainstream medical literature, and I really want to avoid putting poison into my body. I would rather err on the side of too much caution, even if I end up paying a bit more.

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    Anonymous says October 31, 2012

    How bad is it? Tooth decay can be reversed with proper diet and nutrition:

    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/03/reversing-tooth-decay.html

    Reply
    Nyk says October 31, 2012

    The tooth was already patched up by the dentist (with root canal also), with the crown broken in half, and after biting on a bone by accident has now started shaking inside its socket. I have tried pushing it further inward, but I don’t think it will simply heal itself instead of eventually falling off completely.

    Reply
    Mangan says October 31, 2012

    Nyk, I’m afraid I don’t have much insight into this. The only thing I could say is that I have never read about either titanium or zirconium being involved in heavy metal poisoning. (Doesn’t mean that they can’t be.) I’ve had testing done for metals and as I recall neither of these were tested.

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Anonymous says November 1, 2012

Is autism on the increase or are they simply diagnosing more people with it? Looking back there were always kids who were ‘off’ or strange, kind of nutty. They used to get rid of them if they created problems or were non-performers. Behavior challenged types ended up in reform schools. Kids dropped out at sixteen, often disappearing at fifteen and since they were so close anyway no one went looking for them. I remember flunkers dropping out in seventh grade of grammar school. In the days of fuller employment oddballs could support themselves as cleanup guys, night shift workers, etc. Since this diagnosis came around it seemed to fit quite a number of these types, hence the creation of this category. Since having children in the public schools with special needs brings in more money into the system and employs more specialists, there is a built-in financial incentive to expand the category. Borderline cases might now be included. All for the good of the children, of course. Not to deny that there are children who obviously do have issues, but one wonders if the labeling isn’t being pushed somewhat.

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AM says February 13, 2016

In the US, children are no longer diagnosed with mental retardation. In addition, I’ve seen children who I would call having minor personality ticks being diagnosed as “autistic” or on the “autistic spectrum” to get addition help in grade school.

In other words, any kid with something not 100% right, from unable to function and will never function as an adult to “difficult to manage” is all being thrown in under the same diagnosis. It’s no wonder it’s supposedly an epidemic.

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